HERBAL TEA VARIETIES CUSTOMS AND CULTURE

Introduction

 

Where did the heavenly drink originate from?

 

The origins of this famous drink have been a mystery for quite some time. It is suggested that it was first used in China during the

 

Shang dynasty 3rd century AD for its medicinal purposes. Like all Chinese exports, it was not until a European entity came to China and tried it themselves.

 

It is believed that Portuguese priests drank the tea in the 16th century leading to its popularity in the 17th century in Britain, therein beginning the Western obsession with

 

Tea. It was the Portuguese princess Catherine of Braganza who brought the tea to court in Britain as part of her dowry to the King Charles 2nd. In true British style, it was then produced in India to compete with Chinese exports of the product.

 

Conclusion; the Chinese did it first but the British brought

 

about its rise to fame.

 

 

 

 

 

It was the start of an Herbal Addiction

 

Included are some questions to help decide which tea is best suited to you.

 

 

 

 

Herbal Tea is made from the infusion of herbs and spices

 

in hot water and usually is not caffeinated. These drinks are different to other teas like black, green, white, oolong and yellow. It uses cured leaves of the tea plant, Camellia sinensis. In this book, you’ll learn what teas are best used to add to Herbs and Spices to create a good Herbal tea depending on the mood level and energy levels. It is a rough guide to mixing

 

and choosing what to add in a tea and what can be found in one’s own backyard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why Herbal Tea?

 

Unlike most Tea’s, Herbal Tea’s are without caffeine but in this book there is a combination of caffeinated and non-caffeinated Teas depending on your needs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loose Tea or Tea bags?

 

It all comes back to quality. Though loose leaf

 

teas and teas in bags originate from the same plant, many factors influence the quality, taste and longevity of the final tea product.

 

 

 

 

Loose Tea is made from the finest hand-picked buds, whole tea leaves or larger one usually in a combination to

 

make the final product. Loose Tea is also a seasonal affair, meaning that the time of year affects its quality. Think of it like a fine wine, it has to be chosen carefully during the right time of the year during the right harvest and then the process has to be just so.

 

 

 

 

 

Tea bags although they are

 

more widely used the reason for this is mainly supply, demand and price. The tea found in bags often consists of smaller pieces of tea leaves or tea dust, giving a quicker brew. However, for those of you who can taste the subtle distinctions it’s important to note that this gives a different flavour.

 

Loose tea has a fuller flavour and is always recommended. Both of these options have their expiration dates. Tea tends to lose flavour after six months and become stale after one year if it is not stored correctly. The correct method of storing is generally in an airtight sealed location.

 

 

 

 

 

DIY Tea

 

For long term DIY Herbal tea makers, it is recommended to have a backyard with enough space to grow an assortment of herbs.

 

Many items can be store bought like spices though there is a subtle flavour difference from creating Tea from organic produce.

 

Contents

 

  • Herbal Tea

 

Varieties

 

  • Loose Tea or Tea

 

bags?

 

  • Who is it that still

 

drinks tea today?

 

  • Tea Drinking and

 

its Influence in Different Countries and Cultures

 

  • Types of Tea

 

  • What Type of Tea are you?

 

  • How to brew a good cup of Tea

 

  • How to make your own Herbal Tea

 

  • Recipes

 

Herbal Tea Varieties

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Artichoke

 

Bee Balm

 

BoldO

 

Anise

 

Burdock

 

Caraway

 

Catnip

 

Chamomile

 

Chinese knotweed

 

Chrysanthemum

 

Cinnamon

 

Coca

 

Coffee

 

Cerasse

 

Citrus peel

 

Dandelion Coffee

 

Echinacea

 

Elderberry

 

European Mistletoe

 

Fennel

 

Gentian

 

Ginger Root

 

Ginseng

 

Goji

 

Hawthorn

 

Hibiscus

 

Honeybush

 

Horehound

 

Hydrangea

 

Jiaogulan

 

Kapor Tea

 

Kava Kratom Kuzuyu Lapacho Lemon Balm Lemon grass Licorice Root Lime Blossom Mint

 

Mountain Tea Neem Leaf Nettle Leaf New Jersey Tea Noni Tea Oksusu cha Pennyroyal leaf Pine

 

Poppy tea

 

Qishr Tea Red clover Red raspberry

 

Roasted Barley Roasted Wheat Rooibos (Redbush) Rose hip

 

Roselle

 

Rosemary

 

Sagebrush

 

Sage

 

Sakuraya

 

Salvia

 

Sassafras

 

Skullcap

 

Sobacha

 

Spicebush

 

Spruce

 

Staghorn sumac

 

Stevia

 

Thyme

 

Tulsi

 

Valerian

 

Verbena

 

Vetiver

 

Wax gourd

 

Wong Lo Kat

 

Woodruff

 

Yarrow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Can you start by making your own Herbal Tea

 

Garden?

 

 

 

 

 

What’s required?

 

A plot of land,

 

Green fingers or keen attitude

 

You can plant any number of herbs and spices.

 

What’s best recommended for a First Timer-

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